Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Koi in cold weather

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    63

    Koi in cold weather

    Hi,
    It is 56 degrees here in Minnesota for a high. I am not feeding my koi. Is there stuff in my pond to sustain them? They are pretty active and beg as usual. So far I have resisted feeding them. Is that the right thing to do?
    Jeanne in Minnesota

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    12

    feeding Koi

    I usually stop feeding my fish when the water temp is in the 50's. Is this your first fall season with the pond? My fish sustain themselves with the fat they might have stored up during the season and with the algea they eat and some of the plant roots the eat also . They slow down their eating metabolism to next to nothing. How deep is your pond ? Do you think the pond will freeze solid. You will also need an air bubbler if you have a waterfall,cause I usually shut my waterfall off in the cold weather because most of the water freezes on the way down and you have a tendency to lose a lot of water. I hope this helps some

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    63

    Koi

    Yes this my first season with koi. My pond is 36 inches deep at the deepest and my 5 koi have grown from 3 inches to about 9 this summer. I will be keeping them in the pond and have ordered a pond heater to use when ice starts to form. My pump will be off during the cold months. I feel like I am starving them but I have heard that to feed them now would kill them later......
    Jeanne

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    12

    feeding Koi

    I don't use a pond heater cause I live out in N.J. and our weather probably doesn't get as cold as yours. Fish have a way of surviving on their own . Is there some root plants they can feed on or algea ? That should sustain them. Good Luck on your first season .Enjoy

    Stephen

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Town of Genesee, WI
    Posts
    1,965
    Jeanne, you can continue to feed the fish if the water tempeture is above 50 degrees. At around 60 degrees I usually switch over to a low temp food. Not to put a dammper on your plans but a heater will not be enough usualy to keep a hole open in very cold temps. I would suggest investing in a small submersable pump about 600gph with a telescoping air arm. Set the pump in an area of the pond the fish don't usually congregate and place it about 18 inches down in a small basket or bucket with holes drilled in, this way it will keep alot of the algae out that still grows in the winter. Raise/or lower the air arm so that the water just moves the surface of the water, this will keep the surface area here from freezing, you may also keep your heater here. Your fish will tend to stay at the lowest part of the pond, this will be the warmest water. The fish become very dorment you could say, they really do not eat, they will not digest well in cold water, so fatten them up now. Winter is hard, I'm always worried about how they are doing and once the ice is on you really don't see them till spring thaw.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Arnoldsville, Ga.
    Posts
    2,775
    One thing to remember, you must keep a hole open in the ice to vent the gases. As Marla says, use a small pump to break the surface of the water. Many of the folks here made the infamous Tote Box Heater to keep a hole open over the bubbler. It worked in my sub zero temps here in NE Pa when we had a watergarden.

    I now have a Koi pond and we cover that with a solar cover.

    Here are a few pics of the Tote Box Heater. It uses a 60 watt bulb. In the pics, you see two, they are on separate extension cords and we only plugged in one. The other is in case one bulb burns out and the tote box is frozen, you can plug in the other light. Some people made a panel you could open to change the bulb and only used one bulb. Those are swimming noodles around the outside to help it float. We used wire to anchor it to the sides so it did not float around before the ice froze.

    It will keep an opening the size of the tote box open in the ice and the fish will be fine.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tote2.JPG   Tote4.JPG   Tote5.JPG  
    Chuck
    Happy Koi Keeper!
    AKC

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    63
    What is in the picture on the right side, the round black thing?
    Jeanne

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Arnoldsville, Ga.
    Posts
    2,775
    That is a 100w floating heater. That too keeps a hole open in the ice. We wanted to be sure to keep so air venting.

    The most important thing for all Koi and goldfish keepers is to keep a hole open if you get ice on your pond. If not, the fish will die. Our first winter when we had our small watergarden, our bubbler froze over, it looked like a frozen snow cone and the fish were gasping for air under the floating heater. Fortunately we only lost one catfish. From then on, we learned about air venting.
    Chuck
    Happy Koi Keeper!
    AKC

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    63
    Does it do the same thing as a tote box heater?
    Jeanne

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Arnoldsville, Ga.
    Posts
    2,775
    Yes but at a much smaller scale. It only keeps a 2" hole open. I would use a bubbler pump with the tote but that is just me.
    Chuck
    Happy Koi Keeper!
    AKC



About Watergardening.com

    Watergardening.com is a forum devoted to water feature enthusiasts all over the world.

Follow us on

Twitter Facebook youtube RSS Feed